Posts by Other Contributor

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Sideritis

by Other Contributor
grapepalette

Sideritis is a fairly obscure pink-skinned Greek variety found primarily near Patras on the Peloponnese peninsula, and to a lesser extent in the Aegean Islands and Greek Macedonia. Its name is derived from the Greek word sidero, meaning ‘iron’, a reference perhaps to the mineral qualities of the wine. It is most commonly vinified as white wine and its traditional blending partner is Roditis, although […]

Plyto

by Other Contributor
grapepalette

Plytó is an old Greek grape variety grown on the island of Crete. Like many native Greek varieties, it was once well known there but had slipped into obscurity by the end of the 20th Century. Plytó has since been revived by the winemaking Lyrarakis brothers, who grow their vines in high-altitude (1300 ft/400m), low-yielding vineyards. The resulting wine is […]

Petroulianos

by Other Contributor
grapepalette

Petroulianos is a relatively rare light-skinned grape variety from Greece. Due to its low acidity, it is usually used as a blending agent in Peloponnese, although one producer in Lakonia,Ioannis Vatistas, makes a varietal wine from the grape. Petroulianos is a tricky vine to cultivate, which perhaps explains its scarcity. The name Petroulianos comes from the Greek word ‘Petra’, meaning stone, […]

Papazkarasi

by Other Contributor
grapepalette

Papazkarasi is an ancient blue-black grape variety that is native to Turkey. The variety is thought to have ancient Greek origins and was once widely planted. However, many vines have been pulled out over the centuries in favor of higher-yielding varieties. Today, Papazkarasi is grown in the Marmara region, which surrounds the Sea of Marmara in northwest Turkey, […]

Negoska

by Other Contributor
grapepalette

Negoska is a dark-skinned variety grown predominantly in the northern regions of Greece. Originally from Naoussa, Negoska has spread to the surrounding appellations of Macedonia and Goumenissa, where red wines must now consist of at least 20 percent of the variety. The main purpose of Negoska is to complement the highly revered Xynomavro variety. Negoska’s rich, dark-fruit laden palate and earthy characters, comparatively […]

Mavroudi

by Other Contributor
grapepalette

Mavrud, or Mavroudi as it is known in Greece, is a dark-skinned grape variety of Bulgarian origin. Its precise provenance is generally accepted to be Asenovgrad, an appellation (or controliran) in the West Thracian Valley of southern Bulgaria. The low-yielding, late-ripening vine produces small, almost black fruit with thick skins. The grape’s name is derived from the Greek mavro, meaning black, which is appropriate, […]

Mavrotragano

by Other Contributor
grapepalette

Mavrotragano is a dark-skinned variety grown exclusively on the volcanic Greek island of Santorini. Traditionally cultivated for the production of sweet red wines, it now has a somewhat cult status as a high-quality dry red. Mavrotragano was almost uprooted to the point of extinction during Santorini’s tourist boom, when vineyard land was acquired by developers wanting to build hotels […]

Mavrodaphne

by Other Contributor
grapepalette

Mavrodaphne, which is Greek for “black laurel”, is a dark-skinned wine grape variety from the Greek Peloponnese. It is used most often in the production of sweet, fortified wines, such as those from the coastal town of Patras. In the past, Mavrodaphne was generally blended with other, higher-yielding varieties of inferior quality – most often Black Corinthiaki. Happily, a more […]

Mandilaria

by Other Contributor
grapepalette

Mandilaria is a black-skinned red grape most commonly grown on the Greek islands of Rhodes & Crete, in the Aegean Sea. It also grown on the mainland and other Greek islands, where it is known by various names, including Mantilari, Mandelaria and Amorghiano. Mandilaria grapes have thick skins full of polyphenols, notably tannins (responsible for the wines’ drying, grippy texture) […]

Malvasia di Candia

by Other Contributor
grapepalette

Malvasia di Candia is the source of some conjecture in ampelographic circles, with some believing the vine is one of many sub-varieties of the omnipresent Malvasia, while others claim it as an altogether separate cultivar. For full description please see www.winesearcher.com