black corinth

Black Corinth grape

The history of Black Corinth is as enormous as its commercial value since it is the main variety behind one of Greece’s most important agricultural products: currants, which merited a mention even in the ancient texts of Hippocrates and Aristotle. Despite the fact that almost 99% of  Black Corinth normally finds itself sold in a pouch full of currants, the remaining small percentage ends up in the bottles containing Mavrodaphne of Patras, the famous sweet red wine.

All of the northern and western Peloponnese moves to the beat of Black Corinth. It is there that the variety supported on trellises is cultivated on light soil. By the time they are harvested, the grapes of the variety have already gone over the mark of 15 degrees, yet they are left out in the sun for a few days longer before they are vinified. Since legislation stipulates that the variety may participate in the PDO Mavrodaphne of Patras wine with up to 49%, keeping the Mavrodaphne variety company and complementing it, many are the producers who opt for it due to its soft tannins, ample sugars, and good acidity: invariably, Black Corinthends up giving those renowned fortified wines a jolt as well as a velvety sense during their oaking time.

Admittedly, Black Corinth does hide its role in vinification under a bushel but it still does play a vital role since the variety is the basic ingredient of the most famous Greek dessert wine. Thus, every time the senses of a wine connoisseur are enthralled by a mature Mavrodaphne of Patras, Black Corinth is there to share that magical moment.

(Courtesy New wines of Greece)